Universidade de são paulo



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UNIVERSIDADE DE SÃO PAULO

FACULDADE DE FILOSOFIA, LETRAS E CIÊNCIAS HUMANAS

DEPARTAMENTO DE LETRAS MODERNAS
Semestre 01

Disciplina: Literaturas Não Hegemônicas de Língua Inglesa: Literaturas e Culturas Indianas

Código:

Carga horária: 02 horas semanais

Créditos: 02 Número máximo de alunos por turma: 50

Professor: Professora Dra. Laura Izarra

I – OBJETIVOS

  • To study the interaction between literature and history in the development of India as an independent nation. The course focuses on contemporary literature written in English.

  • To reconsider issues of literature and language at the centre and periphery, in the context of India’s changing relationship with its tradition and with the United Kingdom.


  • To give a coherent picture of an ‘alternative canon’ of non-hegemonic literature in English.



II – CONTEÚDO


Politics, literature and language. Changing perceptions of the nation. Nationalism, hybridity and multiculturalism. Questions of identity: ethnicity, race, class and gender. Post-colonial literatures.
III – CRONOGRAMA

  1. Introduction to the course: Literature as imagined history; political and cultural contexts.

  2. Thinkers of the nation: Gandhi, Nehru e Sri Aurobindo

  3. Poetry: Rabindranath Tagore & Das & James Cousins

  4. Short Story: Raja Rao. “Companions” and Anita Desai. “A devoted son”

  5. Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, “The Holy Mother” & “A Lovesong for India” (2011)

  6. Novels, films and short stories in dialogue:

Paraneeta by S. Chattopadhyay (1914) & Amit Chaudhuri’s “The Wedding” (2002). Real Time. Stories and a Reminiscence.pp.157-163.

  1. Partition: A Train to Pakistan by Khushwant Singh (1956) & “Toba Tek Singh” by Saadat Hasan Manto.

  2. History and magic realism: Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie (1981)

  3. Social transformation: The Guide, by R.K. Narayan (1958) & “The Liar” by Mulk Raj Anand .

  4. Salman Rushdie. “Good advice is rarer than rubies” by Salman Rushdie. Away. The Indian Writer as an Expatriate. Ed. A. Kumar.pp.35-37

  5. Diasporic subjects: The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy (1997): 535-558; & “Abhilash Talkies” (pp. 90-117).

  6. The Hungry Tide and/or Sea of Poppies by Amitav Ghosh .

  7. Modern Dalit Literature.“This too shall pass” by P.E.Sonkamble.Ed. Muktibodh (p136-143)

  8. Conclusion

  9. Final Activity


IV – METODOLOGIA

Aulas expositivas e debates sobre textos teóricos e literários. Seminários e resenhas.

Contos, filmes e excertos de romances serão analisados durante as aulas.
V – ATIVIDADES DISCENTES

Participação em aula; leituras programadas de textos críticos e literários; trabalhos práticos; realização de trabalhos de pesquisa. Orientação das resenhas e do trabalho final com auxílio dos estagiários do Projeto PAE.


VI – AVALIAÇÃO ESCRITA E ORAL

  1. Participação em classe (conceito)

  2. Resenhas críticas e trabalhos práticos em sala nas datas programadas para o debate.

  3. Ensaio comparativo sobre um dos romances apresentados durante o curso a ser entregue no mês de maio.

  4. Avaliação oral.


VII - RECUPERAÇÃO:

Normas de recuperação: notas de um a dez, baseadas em trabalhos elaborados durante o recesso escolar e em prova ou trabalho escrito realizado na primeira semana letiva do semestre subseqüente ao da reprovação. A nota final será a média entre a nota de reprovação e a obtida na recuperação.
VIII - BIBLIOGRAFIA

ANDERSON, Benedict. Imagined Communities, Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism London: Verso, 1991

BHABHA, Homi. Nations and Narrations. London: Routledge, 1990.

HALL, Stuart. “Culture, Community, Nation”. In: Representing the Nation: A Reader. Edited by David Boswell and Jesica Evans. London & New York: The Open University Press, 1999. pp 33-44.

GUHA, Ranajit. Dominance without Hegemony. History and Power in Colonial India.Cambridge Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1997.

HOBSBAWM, Eric and Terence Ranger, eds The Invention of Tradition Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.



KUMAR, Sukrita Paul. Cultural Diversity, Linguistic Plurality and Literary Traditions in India. Delhi: Macmillan, 2005.

Muktibodh, Sharatchandra. “What is Dalit Literature”.Poisoned Bread. Ed. Arjun Dangle. Bombay: Orient Longman, 1992. Pp. 267-270.

PARANJAPE, Makarand. Another Canon. Indian Texts and Traditions in English.London, NY, Delhi: Anthem Press, 2010.

___________. Altered DestiNations. Self, Society and Nation in India. London: Anthem Press, 2010.



RushdiE, Salman. Imaginary Homelands. London: Granta Books. Pp. 9-23
IX- BOOKS TO BE READ DURING THE COURSE:

The course reading will focus mainly on representative poetry, shorter fiction and fiction by the writers highlighted in the course outline above (cronograma). The lecturer will compile a course anthology of appropriate extracts from longer materials. Some of the material is freely available online in digital editions.


X- SEMINARS AND/OR RESEARCH ACTIVITY:

Choose one of the novels introduced in class and relate it to the historical period or the social transformation they represent.



O material se encontra na Xerox do prédio de Letras.

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